100 Men Who Give a Damn

HALIFAX—Glenn Bowie, area director of sales and marketing for NewCastle Resorts and general manager of the Westin Halifax, is one of 100 Haligonian men who get together four times a year, bringing a blank cheque with them.

Glenn Bowie

Glenn Bowie

style=”float: right; margin: 0px 0px 10px 10px;”>HALIFAX—Glenn Bowie, area director of sales and marketing
for NewCastle Resorts and general manager of the Westin Halifax, is one of 100
Haligonian men who get together four times a year, bringing a blank cheque with
them. Last time they got together, they raised $27,000, which went to the North
End Community Health Centre.

“It was founded by a couple of fellows I know, and I was
part of the first way of what we call a ‘non-organization,’” Bowie told CLN. No money passes through it – it
goes directly to the charity, he explained, adding that Halifax also has
another group called 100 Women Who Care.

“It’s an easy concept. 
Everyone is busy,” noted Bowie. The group has met at the Westin and at
St. Mary’s church auditorium. Everyone who joins is asked to put in the names
of three or four Nova Scotia based charities.  Two weeks before the meeting, they pull the names of three
charities from what Bowie calls an “electronic hat.” The person who suggested
that charity has five minutes to make the case for their choice, with no props.
After that, everyone votes.

It’s a one-hour meeting and there’s a cash bar afterwards.
Participants come from all walks of life, ranging from students to CEOs,
politicians to the mayor.

The group has raised more than $110,000—in just four hours—since it started in
February. “We’ve given more than $20,000 to each of four charities—Children’s
Wish, the SPCA, North End Community Health Centre and as of Nov. 19, Ovarian Cancer Canada, Atlantic Region.

“We have well north of 100 members,” said Bowie. “Usually
they give $100—and it’s tax deductible because it goes directly to the
charity.”

“The 100 Men movement is one of the most impactful
opportunities I have ever been a part of,” said Chris Conrad, corporate sales
manager for the Halifax Metro Centre. “to make such a difference to our local
community in basically one hour, is an emotional and exhilarating
experience.  I laughed, I cried, I
gave a DAMN,” he said.