Great service gets people talking

TORONTO—Good news travels fast (and far), according to an international study on the impact of good customer service.

TORONTO—Good news travels fast (and far), according to an
international study on the impact of good customer service.

The American Express Great Service Travels Miles Study polled
more than 8,000 respondents in July from Britain, Canada, Mexico and Australia.
It indicated that due to the immediacy of and reach of social media, a good (or
bad) service story can travel the globe within moments.

According to the study, 90 per cent of Canadians will tell
others (an average of 20 people) about a great service experience; 32 per cent
tell others within the hour and 45 per cent within the day.

Julie Hay, vice-president and general manager of world
service at American Express Canada, said the company commissioned the study to
find out how people define great service.

According to participants, the top three requirements for a
good service experience are:

-spontaneity, knowing the act came from the heart (cited by
51 per cent);

– feeling supported, knowing someone went above and beyond
to solve a problem (cited by 39 per cent); and

-receiving a personalized experience (cited by 29 per cent).