IESO can help with lighting retrofits

TORONTO — Sean Brady, director of the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) conservation and corporate relations group, says the Ontario utility has a number of programs to help hotels install new, more energy efficient equipment, including lig

Sean Brady.

Sean Brady.

TORONTO — Sean Brady, director of the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) conservation and corporate relations group, says the Ontario utility has a number of programs to help hotels install new, more energy efficient equipment, including lighting. Saveonenergy.ca provides details on how they can save up to 50 per cent of project costs.

While hotels have “fairly complex ownership arrangements,” IESO can work with them to manage energy efficiency projects.

They can also provide money for energy managers — defined as a person who has experience with energy efficiency and energy projects. IESO offers incentives to help fund the services of an energy manager. This program,which has been around since 2007, has now been rolled into part of IESO’s industrial program.

IESO also offers support for energy audits and engineering studies to identify and quantify and help  build a business case for energy efficiency. These include productivity, safety, guest comfort, capital cost estimates and return on investment.

“Programs like our retrofit and energy manager programs, can support an number of different types of initiatives,” Brady told CLN. 

“Lighting is seen as a good opportunity. LEDs are becoming a go-to resource for hotels due to the energy-saving benefits, customer comfort, guest experience and a positive ambience for the hotel.”

Areas that are receiving attention include the following:

Replacing 90-watt halogen with 10-watt LEDs that use only 11 per cent as much energy, in dining areas.

Vintage lighting formerly achieved with incandescent lights is replaced with 4-watt LEDs that provide the same look and save 90 per cent on energy. 

Lots of lighting designers can help match the colour profiles to ensure the look of the area is maintained.

Maintenance benefits are substantial, and can also apply to guest areas and kitchens, underground parking areas, and exterior signage and lighting.

When combined with control systems and occupancy sensors, lighting changes can help improve safety as well.

So what’s next? Brady is impressed with the Internet of things, including rapid advances in control systems and lighting, and the connectability of various devices.

Here are his recommendations for hotels:

Talk to your local distribution companies about your hotel’s targets.

Conservation offers a way to manage and control rising electricity costs.

Start asking questions about lighting. Check to see if there is any flexibility in timing of activities such as maintenance — you may get better electricity rates by rescheduling pool and equipment maintenance, for example.